Good News for Justice: Binnie's report has been rejected and a new Inquirer is sought

Cabinet have announced that they will sideline both Justice Binnie's report and Fisher's peer review of it and seek out a fresh Inquirer to look at the Bain case and make recommendations in relation to compensation.

The reports can be found here.

This is good news. It means that the incredibly flawed report made by Justice Binnie has been rejected.  One can only hope that the next person to review this case does so with more overall objectivity and sifts through the items rationally.  It also allows for more time to pass before the decision is made, during which time more worms can burrow out of the woodwork.  I say this in relation to Michael Guest making it clear to the previous Minister of Justice that David Bain was prepared to admit that he wore the infamous spectacles on the weekend before the murders.

There is no justice in rewarding someone for carrying out a heinous crime and then protesting their innocence repeatedly and consistently for every day since their crime.  That is the reason why compensation is not automatic following a retrial where a previously incarcerated person is found not guilty.  In David Bain's case, the not guilty verdict does not, in my opinion, mean that he is innocent.  Far from it. There is a preponderance of evidence pointing to David's guilt.  The retrial suffered from a tired and worn out prosecution against a determined and enthusiastic defence and gave a flawed result.

 

  • Joe Karam: Documentary makers motivated by money?

    From Stuff.co.nz: The documentary [Bryan Bruce's The Case Against Robin Bain] did not follow the normal broadcasting standards of balance and fairness, Mr Karam said.

    Huge claims were made solely for the purpose, I would say, of increasing ratings and getting people to watch it.